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Mother’s Day Gift Guide

'Mother’s Day Gift Guide'

Happy Mother’s Day from Olive Films!

M is for the Many things she’s done for you.
O is for the perfect gift from Olive Films
M is for order by May 5th to receive the gift in time for Mother’s Day.

Are you worried about what to get the mother figure in your life to show them how much you care? Look no further! From films whose characters remind us of the power of motherhood and the sacrifices made by the mothers in our lives to films that mothers just seem to love, we can help you find the perfect DVD or Blu-ray to say Happy Mother’s Day!

 

YOURS, MINE AND OURS (1968)

Parenting a family of twenty? Lucille Ball is up to the task! When Navy officer Frank Beardsley (Henry Fonda) meets nurse Helen North (Lucille Ball) with a little help from mutual friend Darrel Harrison (Van Johnson) there’’s an undeniable attraction, although both are apprehensive about any potential romantic involvement, having recently lost their spouses leaving them responsible for raising ten children and eight children respectively. When they decide to wed, unconventionality turns into hilarity in the wacky Yours, Mine and Ours. If your mom likes The Brady Bunch, she’ll love this!

Yours, Mine and Ours is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

 

THE QUIET MAN (1952)

This is the perfect romance film to share with mom, and now in a brand-new Olive Signature edition. Sean Thornton (John Wayne), an American boxer with a tragic past, returns to the Irish town of his youth. There, he purchases his childhood home and falls in love with the fiery local colleen, Mary Kate Danaher (Maureen O’Hara). But Kate’s insistence that Sean conduct his courtship in a proper Irish manner with matchmaker Michaleen Oge Flynn (Barry Fitzgerald) along for the ride as chaperone is but one obstacle to their future together; the other is her brother, “Red” Danaher (Victor McLaglen), who spitefully refuses to give his consent to their marriage, or to honor the tradition of paying a dowry to the husband. Sean couldn’t care less about dowries or any other tradition that might stand in the way of his happiness. But when Mary Kate accuses him of being a coward, Sean is finally ready to take matters into his own hands.

The Quiet Man is available on Olive Signature DVD and Blu-ray.

 

HEARTBREAKERS (2001)

No two mother-daughter relationships are the same, and that’s on full display in the witty and sweet Heartbreakers, which stars Sigourney Weaver and Jennifer Love Hewitt as a mother and daughter con team. Set in Palm Beach, Heartbreakers follows the escapades of Max (Weaver) and Page (Hewitt) Connors, two con artists who use beauty and brains to bilk big bucks from their perspective suitors. Page’’s plan for a solo career is threatened when confronted by the IRS (in the form of Anne Bancroft, The Miracle Worker) for back taxes. So, it’’s time for one last job. And what a last job it’’ll be. With their sites set on tobacco tycoon William B. Tensey (Gene Hackman) it looks like their problems are solved. Enter former con Dean Cummano (Ray Liotta) and potential con (and romantic interest) Jack Withrowe (Jason Lee) and the stage is set for comic confusion of the highest order.

Heartbreakers is available on Blu-ray.

 

INDISCREET (1958)

Here’s another wonderfully charming classic for mom, this time featuring the silver screen pairing of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Romance is in the air when a dashing diplomat (Grant) is introduced to a beautiful and famous actress (Bergman). The fact that he’s married doesn’t stop the love-struck pair from falling into a passionate affair. But it turns out that the actress isn’t the only one with the talent for role-playing – her married lover is actually a single playboy with no intentions of settling down. When his secret is revealed, she decides to give her Romeo a taste of his own medicine.

Indiscreet is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

 

THE LAST BEST YEAR (1990)

Here’s a real tearjerker of a lost treasure with a stellar cast. After falling ill during a business trip, Jane Murray (Bernadette Peters) must confront her own mortality when she’s diagnosed with a terminal illness. Through her physician, Dr. Castle (Brian Bedford), Jane is introduced to Wendy Haller (Mary Tyler Moore), a psychologist who’ll help Jane face the emotional fall-out of her diagnosis. What begins as a professional relationship between doctor and patient, soon blossoms into a close friendship. And as their bond deepens, Wendy is able to see her own vulnerability and longing reflected in Jane.

The Last Best Year is available on DVD.

 

YOUNG AT HEART (1954)

The first screen pairing of “Old Blue Eyes” and “America’s Sweetheart” will have your mom’s heart smiling and her toes tapping with timeless tunes by the Gershwin brothers, Cole Porter and Johnny Mercer. Young at Heart centers on a family headed by a music-loving patriarch (Robert Keith) and his musically inclined daughters looking for romance. Doris Day plays the youngest daughter, Laurie, and Gig Young plays Alex Burke, a likable composer who comes for an extended visit and eventually wins the hearts of all three sisters. Frank Sinatra plays Barney Sloan, a cynical songwriter hired by Alex to do arrangements for an upcoming Broadway show. The praiseworthy cast also includes Dorothy Malone and Elisabeth Fraser as the older sisters, Ethel Barrymore as the family’s matriarch and Alan Hale, Jr. as Robert Neary, a successful businessman engaged to the oldest daughter.

Young at Heart is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

 

A HOME OF OUR OWN (1993)

This family film does a beautiful job illustrating the sacrifices that many parents make for their children and the complicated ways our relationships with our parents changed as we hit those dreaded teen years. Hardworking mother and widow Frances Lacey (Kathy Bates) is just trying to make ends meet when she’s fired from her job at a local potato chip company. Adding insult to injury, her son Shayne (Edward Furlong) is brought to her door by the police for stealing change from local payphones. Deciding it’s time for a fresh start, Frances and her six children pull up stakes in Los Angeles and move to rural Idaho. In search of a better life, Frances and her children (whom she dubs the “Lacey Clan”) spot an unfinished house and decide to do whatever it takes, no matter the challenges and adversity, to buy the property and build a home of their own.

A Home of Our Own is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

 

THE DAY I BECAME A WOMAN (2000)

For the mother more interested in foreign or independent films, give a shot to this hidden gem. As an example of astonishing visual poignancy, “The Day I Became a Woman” is the globally celebrated debut of Marziyeh Meshkini, a young Iranian filmmaker bringing her rich and diversified national cinema to bear on an enduring global concern, in a new crescendo of memorable subtlety and grace. “The Day” is repeated in three consecutive episodes — —the memorial registers of childhood, adolescence, and old age— — when three stages of “becoming” a woman is culturally manufactured and socially registered.

The Day I Became A Woman is available on DVD.

 

COME BACK TO THE 5 & DIME JIMMY DEAN, JIMMY DEAN (1982)

Strong women abound in this Robert Altman film that features early screen performances from some of your mom’s (and yours) favorite 80s stars. After directing a celebrated New York stage production of Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean,  the legendary Altman gave the play the full cinematic treatment. Actresses Sandy Dennis, Cher, Karen Black, and Kathy Bates all reprised their stage roles, and the results are a magical convergence of theatre and film. A group of James Dean devotees reconvene at their teenage hangout, a rural Texas drugstore, twenty years after the death of their beloved idol. But much has changed in the intervening years, and the reunion provides them one final opportunity to expose the secrets and heal the emotional wounds that have lingered among them for two decades.

Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy dean, Jimmy Dean is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

 

May 2, 2017

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